LEAVE YOUNG BIRDS BE!!


Please, do not hamper a young bird's life by picking it up, and taking it home with you. It is calling its parents to help them in locating it.
After fledgling from the nest, the parent birds will keep feeding it, and look out for it, until it will be able to look after itself.
And the reason you cannot see a parent is because of your own proxomity to the young bird. And while you are ebating if or not you should take the bird home, you keep the parent from giving it well needed nutrition in the form of a meal!


Photos

The photos on this blog are all taken by me. If there is any picture you might want to use for any other than personal use, please drop me a line to the email address shown in the sidebar on the right.

Sunday, October 25, 2009

Wood eating Blue Tit.

22/10/09:
I sat observing my little Blue Tit, who'd flown in, and come to feed, I assumed. After landing in the Fennel, from where it usually will start feeding in the Fennel planter which is their birdtable. It had different ideas, however. Most of the birds in my garden will feed on Insects on the stalks of the Fennel (and also inside) and many will pick out Insects on the wood of either the planter itself or on the wooden shelving, beyond.



Birds like Wrens will always go underneath the shelf, to feed on the life on the wooden supports, where it can feed unnoticed and in peace.
The Blue Tit was looking deeper than most Birds would. The bird started to confuse, when I spotted these bits of shelf in its beak! OK, I know birds need minerals and also grit, so their stomachs can digest their food. Bt shreds of wood?
At the end of the day, we thought that was that. But it wasn't, was it?

As a great surprise, the same Blue Tit, again landed on the shelf,

Birds And guess what?
Yep!She was back hanging on the shelf again, as the day before!
Blue Tit, Parus caeruleus


Elsewhere in the garden:
Great Tit, Parus major, feeding on Insects/Invertebrates, found among the roots of the Fennel, in the planter.
Birds



This assured looking female House Sparrow, Passer domesticus

Birds


Birds

Female Chaffinch, Fringilla coelebs:
female Chaffinch, Fringilla coelebs

Any explanation towards this behaviour of my Blue Tit, would be very welcome. Please leave a comment or drop an email to birdingonwheels@gmail.com

7 comments:

  1. As a child I was fostered out on a farm, that had a deep litter . These where long sheds where the laying hens would roam around in relative comfort and laid eggs in nest boxes that could be got at externally for collection of the eggs. on the floor of the hut was saw dust hence the name deep litter huts,
    The guy who was then our foster dad told us that the hens used to lay door knobs. from eating too much of the sawdust,
    later I found out the mill where we had the sawdust from made all kinds of things from wood. and wooden knobs was one of them and defects would be strewn into the sawdust pile. that eventually would be found by little boys who would have been told that the hens laid door knobs. so I wonder what story you would tell about the blue tits who ate wood chips?

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  2. great story, Tony! I will have to think of something. I will not be able to beat your door knobs, however.
    I might have to look at the eggs in spring, LOl! She is still at it, our little Blue Tit.

    Francis, my hubby, told me that she is also feeding on grit from the breeze block wall up front, where the council built a high wall to prevent us toppling down the hill.

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  3. What a lovely story about the door knobs! We used to have a Blue Tit at our old house that did the same thing and peeled away wood from our fence panels in the back garden - I never did find out why! How bizarre! In answer to your question (on my blog), I currently live in Co. Wicklow - you're very lucky to be living in Cork, I think it's the most beautiful part of Ireland! I went to Bantry for a holiday about 6 years ago, fell in love with the place & moved to Ireland almost 3 years ago. You have some fantastic scenery & wildlife where you are (I'm green with envy, in case you hadn't guessed!)

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  4. Wicklow is stunning too, Sharon. Must be, otherwise you wouldn't have settled down there, right?

    Do you ever see any of the Red Kites, which haven't been poisoined/shot?

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  5. pics 1&5 are stunning!!

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  6. Thank you Pete, for your lovely comment.

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Yoke.